Floor Framing

Not that we ever felt things were moving slowly before, but framing sure moves along quickly. After securing the mud sills around the perimeter walls and setting up the girder beams yesterday, today they moved forward with filling in the floor joists between the girders and exterior walls. 

The wide open stem walls begin to fill up with floor joists and girders. Rim joists are added cap the ends at the edge of the mud sills.

The wide open stem walls begin to fill up with floor joists and girders. Rim joists are added cap the ends at the edge of the mud sills.

Establishing concrete stem walls took several days to dig, then put up formwork, and eventually pour concrete. While the pouring of concrete was just a day, there were several steps of preparation and progress that led to the "ta-dah" moment of seeing built walls. With stick framing, things move quickly and show up almost instantaneously. It's a benefit of working with wood, being able to move pieces quickly, cut on the spot, and nail right down. 

It's quickly becoming real – our floor is taking form. Notice the members are darker than your typical framing lumber. This is because the mud sills, girders, and joists are all pressure treated. Up close, you can see little staple marks where they injected the preservative chemicals in the pressure treatment process. All lumber below the flood plane should be P.T.

It's quickly becoming real – our floor is taking form. Notice the members are darker than your typical framing lumber. This is because the mud sills, girders, and joists are all pressure treated. Up close, you can see little staple marks where they injected the preservative chemicals in the pressure treatment process. All lumber below the flood plane should be P.T.

Once the floor framing is done, our plumber will come to rough the plumbing fixtures and make sure they work with the framing in place. The framers started Wednesday and expect to finish the floor framing by Monday. Four days to lay down a floor and attach it to the foundation, not bad at all. 

It's also at this point in elevation that we can switch to regular lumber, or wood that isn't pressure treated. As we pass the +10.5' mark of our AE10.5 flood zone, the joists will be covered with an exterior grade plywood to make way for our floor. Early on in the design process, we chose to go with a hydronic floor, which we'll elaborate on in a future blog post. This led to our decision to go with an exposed concrete floor. Stay tuned!

Bonus shot of our crawl space. 

Bonus shot of our crawl space.