Concrete Pour: Finish Work

This is a LONG overdue post that was supposed to be my first post of the 2016 calendar year. Just when you thought I couldn't make another post about concrete at the Contemporary Cottage, I bring you pictures of the final concrete pours on the job. 

What was left? Well, we needed a proper entry up to the finished floor.

Here's the pad at the top of the entry stair.

Here's the pad at the top of the entry stair.

Here's where the pad meets the first riser down.

Here's where the pad meets the first riser down.

Contrary to what you might think, a concrete stair isn't made of solid concrete. There's gravel piled up and compounded to serve as the base of our stairs and entry. 

Contrary to what you might think, a concrete stair isn't made of solid concrete. There's gravel piled up and compounded to serve as the base of our stairs and entry. 

A closer look at the reinforcing bar ("re-bar") that will help the concrete to hold together and cause less cracks. 

A closer look at the reinforcing bar ("re-bar") that will help the concrete to hold together and cause less cracks. 

Other than the front entry steps, the very rear footing for the exterior deck, the 'garage' floor, and of course the highlight of exposed concrete on the project: the "finished" interior floors.

Here's the rear footing for the end of the deck. The deck will come out level with the bottom of the sliding doors for about 6 feet, before starting to climb down generously deep treaded stairs, to the concrete footing.

Here's the rear footing for the end of the deck. The deck will come out level with the bottom of the sliding doors for about 6 feet, before starting to climb down generously deep treaded stairs, to the concrete footing.

The garage floor. Also needs rebar and a vapor retarder underneath. That's the crawl space door to the right. As opposed to a more typical garage slab, we didn't slope this one. There will be absolutely no water spraying in here as it will serve as our new office space.

The garage floor. Also needs rebar and a vapor retarder underneath. That's the crawl space door to the right. As opposed to a more typical garage slab, we didn't slope this one. There will be absolutely no water spraying in here as it will serve as our new office space.

The finished concrete floor inside the house. That long hose is bringing in the pumped concrete. A traditional concrete truck pulls into the driveway, a pump is hooked up to the concrete, and the hose brings it in. 

The finished concrete floor inside the house. That long hose is bringing in the pumped concrete. A traditional concrete truck pulls into the driveway, a pump is hooked up to the concrete, and the hose brings it in. 

As they work their way towards the front entry of the house.

As they work their way towards the front entry of the house.

All poured and ready for the finishers to make it smooth.

All poured and ready for the finishers to make it smooth.

After letting the concrete cure for a day, the finish team came back to saw cut control joints. Cracks in long expanses of concrete are inevitable, but control joints help to control where the cracking will begin to occur. This way, we can try to avoid the random cracking, and keep cracking to where we would prefer for them to happen. 

Mmm, freshly poured concrete. this happens to be the kitchen and dining area.

Mmm, freshly poured concrete. this happens to be the kitchen and dining area.

Chalk lines are snapped where the saw cuts will be added for control joints.

Chalk lines are snapped where the saw cuts will be added for control joints.

Here's an example of two control joints that form a cross.

Here's an example of two control joints that form a cross.