Exterior Siding

We have three different kinds of exterior walls on the Contemporary Cottage:
1. Stucco
2. Wood Siding
3. Concrete

Here's a good picture that portrays all three. Dark gray is the stucco (brown coat), wood siding to the right, and concrete stem wall lining the bottom.

Here's a good picture that portrays all three. Dark gray is the stucco (brown coat), wood siding to the right, and concrete stem wall lining the bottom.

The stucco siding is a commonly used exterior finish for buildings. While it may seem overused in a lot of buildings throughout this area, it's durable, and can be interesting and beautiful if done right. The stucco coating process consists of three steps: the scratch coat, brown coat, and finish coat. The scratch coat goes on wire mesh sometimes referred to as 'chicken wire.'

A rainscreen was applied over the (black) building paper to hold the siding off the wall in case any moisture builds up and for vapor to breath. On top of the rainscreen, was attached the wire mesh to hold the scratch coat. You can see it going up here.

A rainscreen was applied over the (black) building paper to hold the siding off the wall in case any moisture builds up and for vapor to breath. On top of the rainscreen, was attached the wire mesh to hold the scratch coat. You can see it going up here.

The wood siding we're using is stained cedar. The cedar was provided to us by the framer and the edges came tongue-&-groove ready. 

Here's a picture of the back priming process. Although we'll only end up seeing one side of the cedar, it's always smart to seal the back as well, so that moisture doesn't build up inside the wood. As opposed to old school oil based stain, we went with a much more earth friendly water-based stain from Benjamin Moore.

Here's a picture of the back priming process. Although we'll only end up seeing one side of the cedar, it's always smart to seal the back as well, so that moisture doesn't build up inside the wood. As opposed to old school oil based stain, we went with a much more earth friendly water-based stain from Benjamin Moore.

The back-sealed cedar pieces make their way up onto the wall itself. The strips of furring hold the cedar away from the actual building paper so everything can breath. The cedar finish you see here is still natural. The finish stain is applied after all the wood siding goes up.

The back-sealed cedar pieces make their way up onto the wall itself. The strips of furring hold the cedar away from the actual building paper so everything can breath. The cedar finish you see here is still natural. The finish stain is applied after all the wood siding goes up.

Our contractor suggested we use an "X" corner bracket at the outside corners. The metal strip at the corner caps the wood siding and it turned out super nice. Notice the building paper, and vycor. The wall breathes, but we don't want moisture to get inside the house. 

Our contractor suggested we use an "X" corner bracket at the outside corners. The metal strip at the corner caps the wood siding and it turned out super nice. Notice the building paper, and vycor. The wall breathes, but we don't want moisture to get inside the house. 

Here's the same corner after tall the siding has been put on. Clean and minimal. 

Here's the same corner after tall the siding has been put on. Clean and minimal. 

Here's an exterior shot that shows the wood siding already stained, and a relatively fresh brown coat of stucco. If you look closely, you can see the garage was done earlier, hence the lighter color from the stucco beginning to cure. 

Here's an exterior shot that shows the wood siding already stained, and a relatively fresh brown coat of stucco. If you look closely, you can see the garage was done earlier, hence the lighter color from the stucco beginning to cure.