Roofing

With the ongoing drought in California, any chance of rain gets us a little antsy. Although we dodged the big rains down south in the Los Angeles area, we expected had some sprinkles up here in the Bay Area this past week as well. That meant the pressure was on to get the building roofed and waterproofed.

For our contemporary cottage, we're using a TPO membrane on the roof. TPO stands for 'thermoplastic polyolefin' and the term is an industry standard when it comes to flat roofs. This stuff comes in rolls like a carpet and different varying thicknesses depending on the application and warranty. We're going with a hefty 60 millimeter TPO that will weatherproof the roof framing and keep the rain out.

TPO comes in rolls. It's can get extremely heavy...

TPO comes in rolls. It's can get extremely heavy...

Before the actual roofing went on, we had to cap the outside of the roof with a proper fascia. After debating whether we should just seal and paint the wood rim joist, we decided to do it justice and use a bent metal piece that would provide a proper drip and consistent look to the house.

This is the profile of the metal fascia that will cap the rim joist around the roof. The small crimp on the left is what will be the drip, while the 4" extension on the right, it what will slide directly on top of the plywood sheathing. 

This is the profile of the metal fascia that will cap the rim joist around the roof. The small crimp on the left is what will be the drip, while the 4" extension on the right, it what will slide directly on top of the plywood sheathing. 

Before the metal fascia could be applied, the rim joist had to be properly weatherproofed as well. You can't just throw metal onto wood and expect things to stay dry or water not to seep through somehow. 

Notice the wrap that goes on over the rim joist. 

Notice the wrap that goes on over the rim joist. 

Here are the guys installing the metal fascia over the waterproofed rim joist fascia.

Here are the guys installing the metal fascia over the waterproofed rim joist fascia.

The metal fascia was lapped and secured to provide a continuous look around the roof. 

You can see the overlapping of the fascia metal if you look closely.

You can see the overlapping of the fascia metal if you look closely.

We love how it looks. The color just-so-happened to go with the concrete stem wall and it will also compliment the TPO. We'll make the gutter with the same metal as the fascia. 

We love how it looks. The color just-so-happened to go with the concrete stem wall and it will also compliment the TPO. We'll make the gutter with the same metal as the fascia. 

Once we have the fascias covered a separate roofing crew came in and made super quick work.  It helps to have a simple, relatively flat roof in this case. 

It also helps just to have a large crew that knows how to work together.

It also helps just to have a large crew that knows how to work together.

Here's a blurry poorly auto-focused look at the thickness of the TPO. That's going to last a long time.

Here's a blurry poorly auto-focused look at the thickness of the TPO. That's going to last a long time.

The crew rolls out TPO to come up with a layout pattern, then they begin actually installing.

Roll it along the roof...

Roll it along the roof...

Apply adhesive and make sure to cover the joints...

Apply adhesive and make sure to cover the joints...

Apply a flashing piece over the TPO at the edges, and then an additional strip of TPO over the flashing. Waterproofing with purpose.

Apply a flashing piece over the TPO at the edges, and then an additional strip of TPO over the flashing. Waterproofing with purpose.

You might notice the skylight curb in the pictures above. That get its own TPO before the skylight is properly flashed in its own right. Other than the skylight, there are a host of other roof penetrations. 

Ventilation stacks for plumbing fixtures, as well as the gas tankless water heater. 

Ventilation stacks for plumbing fixtures, as well as the gas tankless water heater. 

And that's the roof! They guys nearly finished in one day. There were some extra laps that didn't get secured, but not nearly enough rain came down to make a difference, and they came back the next morning to wrap that up. With the house elevated above the base flood elevation and now roofed in, we're feeling pretty good about holding up the elements and are excited by the continuing work inside as well as on the exterior walls. 

We'll blog about this black stuff coming soon...

We'll blog about this black stuff coming soon...