Framing Almost Complete

Framing is wrapping up. Besides a few interior walls that have been left unsheathed for framing inspection, the exterior is looking pretty good! 

Looking more and more like a real house!

Looking more and more like a real house!

You'll notice the rafters have been sorted out and the rim joists have been added. Speaking of the rim joist, we had to make a design decision on whether or not it would be plumb with the wall, or perpendicular with the roof. 

Exterior walls, topped with roof rafters, capped off with rim joists.

Exterior walls, topped with roof rafters, capped off with rim joists.

Our original roof design was for a true flat roof structure, that was to be topped with built-up foam to give us the minimum slope for drainage. After careful though and considering, including pricing numbers, we decided against the build-up foam and decided to slope the roof altogether. Due to height restrictions and to stay true to the design, we sloped the roof structure 1/2" per foot (12"), just a little more than the minimum required 1/4" per foot for "flat" roofs. 

Front of the house is to the left. You can make out the slight slope. The box in the middle is the curb for the hall skylight. 

Front of the house is to the left. You can make out the slight slope. The box in the middle is the curb for the hall skylight. 

Once the framers started laying the rafters, we were hit with a decision on what to do with the frieze blocks and blocking between the roof joists. Since the skylights were already blocked out perpendicular and parallel to the roof structure itself (at the 1/2" per foot remember), we decided to stay true to the roof in this manner and had all the blocking done plumb to the rafters. We would do the same to the rim joists... so I thought. 

You can't really tell from the picture or in physical presence, that the blocking between the joists at the walls are NOT parallel with the walls themselves. They're plumb with the roof structure, in other words, perpendicular/parallel to the roof joists. The skylights are framed plumb to the roof framing itself also.

You can't really tell from the picture or in physical presence, that the blocking between the joists at the walls are NOT parallel with the walls themselves. They're plumb with the roof structure, in other words, perpendicular/parallel to the roof joists. The skylights are framed plumb to the roof framing itself also.

One morning I was walking the site and and noticed that the rafter tails were cut to hang the rim joists plumb with the wall. I still go back and forth on this, but think it works either way as long as there's some consistency. If the rim joists are plumb with the walls, should the skylight curbs and frieze blocks have been plumb with the walls as well? 

In the end, ALL of the roof framing is plumb with itself (using the sloped rafters as the datum), EXCEPT for the rim joists that are plumb with the walls, or in other words, the rim joists are "perfectly" vertical. Bonus side remark: Do you see the triple joists towards the right of the door opening? That is for Hanna's hanging chair!

In the end, ALL of the roof framing is plumb with itself (using the sloped rafters as the datum), EXCEPT for the rim joists that are plumb with the walls, or in other words, the rim joists are "perfectly" vertical. Bonus side remark: Do you see the triple joists towards the right of the door opening? That is for Hanna's hanging chair!

The framing is nearly completed and we're ready for the fascia work to begin. After debating between painting the fascia (rim joist) or capping it off with metal, we decided to go with the metal to give it a more refined look and blend better with the other design elements such as the concrete stem wall.