Architalks #22: Career Path? Follow Your Heart!

It's been a few months since the last #Architalk, but our topic this month has to do with each person's career path to where they are now. For me, my career path can be summed up by 'following my heart'. Sometimes you get that tug in your heart and you have to go in a direction that doesn't seem to make sense at first. Be sure to follow that tug to the other blog posts for this #Architalk, but this is my career path:

As mentioned in previous posts, I graduated from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo's 5-year Architecture program in the summer of 2008. I thought the whole architectural world was open for me to decide where I wanted to go at the time. I think the majority of us come out of architecture school thinking we can design skyscrapers (or similar) right out of the box. 

I spent my summer before thesis year (before my 5th year) in Korea thinking it would be the last extended vacation before going into hard labor. I planned visits to multiple architecture offices and was curious how the practice of architecture was different in Korea. Though I was born in Korea, I immigrated with my parents as a toddler and have always questioned my cultural background and heritage. At one of the offices I visited, I was told (in what I though was a joke or told half-heartedly) that I could work there after graduation since I spoke both English and Korean. The Architect, Byoung Soo Cho, had studied in the US himself at Montana and GSD. 

But life went on after gearing back up for 5th year in San Luis Obispo. I spent long hours in the studio working on my thesis project, and come spring, I had multiple offers from firms in San Francisco, not to mention the firm I had interned at previously in San Luis Obispo too. When it came to deciding between my options, I was reminded of my past trip to Korea and the office that extended me an offer to join them. Was he serious? I emailed Byoung, we had a conference call, he gave me an official invitation, and I decided to go to Korea upon graduation. I immediately notified the firms in California that I was headed out of the country.

This turned out to be one of the best decisions in my life for several different reasons, but first, economically. Summer and fall of 2008 presented a market crash and beginning of a recession. Many of my peers, including those that had signed offer sheets in San Francisco and Los Angeles, all of sudden found their offers revoked. I even had a few friends start at a office, only to be let go almost immediately. Meanwhile in Korea, the recession had yet to really hit, and in fact, the economy was only getting stronger with more Silicon Valley tech companies using Korean parts and production, along with Korea's automotive groups taking large chunks of the Japanese market due to various recalls. Although in the midst of things while working in Korea, I was getting exhausted and felt a little under-appreciated at times, it was without a doubt my most memorable job.

After burning out at the office and resigning in 2010 to return back to the states (probably not at the best time since the recession was still in effect), I spend a month picking up the pieces in Korea and eventually followed my now partner and spouse to France. Luck had it that I knew a childhood friend working for an architecture office in Paris and they needed some help putting together a huge model for an exhibition. The timing could not have been more perfect as I was still only 2 years out of school and able to get a student visa (Carte de Séjour) to work as a legit paid intern. 

After the exhibition and working additional time in Paris, my other half took the lead to New York for her own internship where I again tagged along. While it was harder to find work so abruptly, I did manage to work for an architect in Manhattan who was working on a penthouse remodel on Park Avenue and put my SketchUp skills to good use. 

After her internship ended in NYC, we couldn't afford to stick it out on Manhattan, but as chance would have it, my parents were returning to Korea after my father had been out of a job for a year (still a recession). This opened up our house in California, and we went from the East Coast, to the West Coast. There was a firm in Palo Alto that was doing some interesting work while I was still in school at Cal Poly. I had contacted them almost every break while retuning to Palo Alto and was unable to secure an internship, but this time around, they had a full-time job opening. 

I eventually came out of that office to re-connect with the person that had given me my first opportunity to learn what goes on in an architecture office, back when I was in high school. He had nearly closed shop during the recession, but asked if I would be interested in keeping it going. I decided it would be a great learning opportunity to learn how to manage and operate my own projects, let alone a whole office and to this day, am still involved. Palo Alto Design Studio wouldn't be here without his mentoring and encouragement. 

A new turn is coming at the end of the year. Palo Alto Design Studio was rather quickly formed and a sole proprietorship. Starting in 2017, my partner and I will transition our latest venture into a new company called "J&K Atelier". We're excited for what's to come, and even more excited to be able to share it with you in the coming months. Follow your heart. I followed mine, and it keeps on beating.

Bob Borson - Life of An Architect (@bobborson)
http://www.lifeofanarchitect.com/then-and-now-architectural-design-or-accounting/

Matthew Stanfield - FiELD9: architecture (@FiELD9arch)
Where It All Went Right

Marica McKeel - Studio MM (@ArchitectMM)
From Then to Now...Residential Architect

Jeff Echols - Architect Of The Internet (@Jeff_Echols)
Well, How Did I Get Here

Mark R. LePage - EntreArchitect (@EntreArchitect)
The Biggest Surprise of My Life as an Architect

Lora Teagarden - L² Design, LLC (@L2DesignLLC)
Then & Now...and the middle

Nicholas Renard - Renard Architecture (@dig-arch)
15 Years of Architecture

Jeremiah Russell, AIA - ROGUE Architecture (@rogue_architect)
then and now: #architalks

Eric T. Faulkner - Rock Talk (@wishingrockhome)
Then-Now: A Schematic Story

Stephen Ramos - BUILDINGS ARE COOL (@sramos_BAC)
Big Ass Buildings

brady ernst - Soapbox Architect (@bradyernstAIA)
Pens & Fizzy Drinks: Or How to Set Measurable Career Goals

Brian Paletz - The Emerging Architect (@bpaletz)
How did I get here?

Michael LaValley - Evolving Architect (@archivalley)
Reflection on My Wonderful, Unexpected Career

Emily Grandstaff-Rice - Emily Grandstaff-Rice FAIA (@egrfaia)
Being the light in darkness

Daniel Beck - The Architect's Checklist (@archchecklist)

Jarod Hall - di'velept (@divelept)
The Joys of Being an Architect

Anthony Richardson - That Architecture Student (@thatarchstudent)
Then and Now

Nisha Kandiah - TCDS (@SKRIBBLES_INC)
Then & Now : Still Chasing the Dream

Jim Mehaffey - Yeoman Architect (@jamesmehaffey)
The Reluctant Code Guru

Tim Ung - Journey of an Architect (@timothy_ung)
10 Lessons Learned from a Young Architect

Mark Stephens - Mark Stephens Architects (@architectmark)
#Architalks 22 - Then and now

Not so Chiquita

We are still alive! With all the moving and our little one getting more mobile, it's been hard to keep up with writing posts, but our practice (both raising a child and architecture & design) continues! A direct result of this is one of our recently completed projects located in the nearby city of Mountain View, on Chiquita Avenue. 

Mountain View is neighbor to Palo Alto, but distinctly different. This project happens to be on a street parallel to the main downtown, but several blocks away – in a mixed density residential community. The house to the left of ours (when looking at it from the street) is a detached single family dwelling that looks to have been remodeled or built in the past 10 years. The property to the right is a multifamily two-story apartment building. 

Our original single story house was just around 1,500 S.F. in total area. The lot itself is abnormally large for this part of town at just over 9,000 S.F. That kind of explains how the neighbor was able to rezone and build an apartment. In other words, the FAR or Floor to Area ratio for our lot was very low – which meant the house could be significantly larger, and we have a huge backyard to work with.

The temporary homeowner was a real estate investor. Before you cringe, this is a very smart and savvy home investor who has been an absolute pleasure to work with (and no, I don't think she reads our blog). We worked as a team to scroll through our options, some of which included, "Should we demo and build new?"; "Simply add a second story?"; "See if the zoning would allow for multiple homes?"; "Convert a single family home property into a multifamily lot?"

In the end, we decided to keep the home single story and add onto the back into the backyard. This would respect the neighborhood, keeping the small single story look of the home from the street essentially the same, with a small facelift. We would double the square footage of the home by pushing out into the back, preserving a single story design throughout. This really fit with the project name and address. A small house on Chiquita Avenue keeps the same small look but is over 3,000 S.F. ! That's not a small house by any means, but no one will be able to tell from the street. 

Enough text, here are some pictures:

Before...

Before...

An early elevation study sketch...

An early elevation study sketch...

And here's after... (photo courtesy of Coldwell Banker)

And here's after... (photo courtesy of Coldwell Banker)

Adding onto the back of the existing house.

Adding onto the back of the existing house.

Looking out into the addition, the contractor used prefabricated trusses to resolve the new roof. 

Looking out into the addition, the contractor used prefabricated trusses to resolve the new roof. 

The existing front stripped of its stucco siding. Note we moved the entrance door from a side facing, to street facing.

The existing front stripped of its stucco siding. Note we moved the entrance door from a side facing, to street facing.

New plywood sheathing, feels so good!

New plywood sheathing, feels so good!

Sheathing is wrapped, Hardy panels being installed, and our little entrance feature on top.

Sheathing is wrapped, Hardy panels being installed, and our little entrance feature on top.

Near completion, fresh paint, new doors and windows, new roofing.

Near completion, fresh paint, new doors and windows, new roofing.

The following interior photographs are courtesy of Coldwell Banker.

Kitchen, dining, living beyond.

Kitchen, dining, living beyond.

View from the opposite angle: living, sitting, dining, kitchen, entrance.

View from the opposite angle: living, sitting, dining, kitchen, entrance.

Up close at the kitchen.

Up close at the kitchen.

Looking out into the still large rear yard.

Looking out into the still large rear yard.

One of the two master bedroom suites.

One of the two master bedroom suites.

We hope you enjoyed out little chiquita project. Cheers!

Architalks #21: Back to School: Seoul Studio

This is the 21st installment of the Architalks... "Back to School." 

For years and years, back to school meant literally going back to school. From kindergarten, perhaps even preschool, all the way through the college years, "back to school" is back to school. Now, nearly 10 years removed from formal school, back to school has a different meaning for us. Our 1-year old will begin day-care which is sort of a [back] to school for all of us. This of course frees up a few more hours for us to work on Palo Alto Design Studio projects. But really for the sake of this blog post, I wanted to focus on our desire to get involved in academia and teaching.

A job site poster of the 1km long mega structure that would contain a mix of stores, apartments, and everything else in-between.

A job site poster of the 1km long mega structure that would contain a mix of stores, apartments, and everything else in-between.

A bird's-eye view of the colossal structures. They look almost like boats in the middle of the city sea.

A bird's-eye view of the colossal structures. They look almost like boats in the middle of the city sea.

A rare look inside the upper story apartment circulation halls.

A rare look inside the upper story apartment circulation halls.

I have a sincere nostalgia for architectural design studio and it is my hope to get the opportunity to teach one in the near future. Whenever I've had some free time of late, one of the things I've been focusing on is putting together a design studio syllabus – partly for fun, partly because I'm determined to teach a studio, and partly because I'm just psycho like that. 

The title of our design studio would (will) be, "Seoul Studio: Apartment Living." Korea has developed a pretty unique apartment culture. While to the someone that has less contact with Korea may think 'China, Japan, Korea, aren't they pretty similar?' Korea, actually has a significantly different stance and adaptation on apartment life that fuels and provides shelter for the isolated country. I've lived in several different apartment types and continue to be fascinated by Korean apartment living and how its evolved. 

We start our quarter/semester with case studies on residential living, giving each student in our studio the task of choosing a residential living condition and presenting it to our studio. This will give us a basic understanding of how people live, what we consider shelter, how we make a house a home, etc. I will also give a presentation on Korea and its lifestyle as a primer for our week-long class trip to Seoul where we will visit several different apartment types, supplemented by visits to architects' offices and various other architectural sites including the site for our project, a new apartment tower/complex in the heart of Seoul. 

Once back in the U S of A, the students will dive into formal site analysis and organization, while also beginning massing studies for their apartments. This of course develops into schematic design, a round of critiques by professionals, followed by design development and refinement into the final project. 

Below are pictures of Seoul's Olympic Village for the 1988 Summer Games. They athlete apartments were sold to the public upon finishing the olympics and are still inhabited today. Photos courtesy of KSW Architects.

Olympic_Village_1_cropped.jpg

You absolutely must check out the other blog posts in this month's topic of "Back to School":

Enoch Sears - Business of Architecture (@businessofarch)
Back to school!


Bob Borson - Life of An Architect (@bobborson)
http://www.lifeofanarchitect.com/i-wish-i-were-going-back-to-school/


Matthew Stanfield - FiELD9: architecture (@FiELD9arch)
Designing Back to School


Marica McKeel - Studio MM (@ArchitectMM)
ArchiTalks: "Back To School"


Jeff Echols - Architect Of The Internet (@Jeff_Echols)
What Have We Learned? It's Back To School For #ArchiTalks 21


Lee Calisti, AIA - Think Architect (@LeeCalisti)
good to go back to school


Mark R. LePage - EntreArchitect (@EntreArchitect)
Back to School: Marketing for Architects


Lora Teagarden - L² Design, LLC (@L2DesignLLC)
4 Tips As You Go Back To School


Cormac Phalen - Cormac Phalen (@archy_type)
Back to School Again


Michele Grace Hottel - Michele Grace Hottel, Architect (@mghottel)
#architalks 21 "back to school"


Michael Riscica - Young Architect (@YoungArchitxPDX)
Let’s Get Back To (Architect) School …or Work.


brady ernst - Soapbox Architect (@bradyernstAIA)
Back to the Cartography Board


Brian Paletz - The Emerging Architect (@bpaletz)
Back to School


Michael LaValley - Evolving Architect (@archivalley)
#ArchiTalks / 15 Ways to Make the Most of Your Architectural Education


Eric Wittman - intern[life] (@rico_w)
getting [schooled] again


Sharon George - Architecture By George (@sharonraigeorge)
What's better than architecture after school?


Jarod Hall - di'velept (@divelept)
Back to {Architecture} School


Drew Paul Bell - Drew Paul Bell (@DrewPaulBell)
Back to School...Suckasssssss


Jared W. Smith - Architect OWL (@ArchitectOWL)
Back to School...


Adam Denais - Defragging Architecture (@DefragArch)
[ArchiTalks #21] 10 Things Architecture Students Say Going Back to School


Jim Mehaffey - Yeoman Architect (@jamesmehaffey)
Back to School? It Doesn't Stop there for Architects.


Tim Ung - Journey of an Architect (@timothy_ung)
10 Things I wish I knew about Architecture School

p.s. Another "creative" way we looked at this topic was thinking about it as a turning your back to school. A few months ago, a Cal Poly alumnus of Kyu's wrote a pretty provocative blog post of her own regarding architecture schooling and the profession. Read all about it here: Dear Cal Poly – You Taught Me Nothing About Architecture

p.p.s. If you read through her whole post, she isn't really turning her back to school at all, especially Cal Poly. :)

Summer in Seoul

This is the twentieth post in a group series called #ArchiTalks in which Bob Borson of Life of an Architect gives a group of us architects a theme or a set of questions and we all have to post our response… this month’s theme: “Summer”.

One of the newer Korean apartment towers. This isn't even Seoul!

One of the newer Korean apartment towers. This isn't even Seoul!

Last summer, we had a baby. Sometimes we call our projects babies, but last summer we really had a physical living baby. Since both of our parents live in Korea, they have been eagerly awaiting their grandson (even though they've seen him at least once since birth last summer) as we prepared to travel to Korea. 

The picture at the beginning of this post is from our base in Ilsan. It's a "suburb" of Seoul but actually a pretty large city in it of itself – as you can see from the photo. It's not photoshopped, that is the real deal. 50 story plus apartment towers. This happens to be the tallest apartment in Ilsan, but more are on the way. Apartment tower life is the norm in Korea, especially in larger metropolitan areas. 

Apartment towers are the norm in Korea. I told you so. And again, this isn't even Seoul.

Apartment towers are the norm in Korea. I told you so. And again, this isn't even Seoul.

Korea is a fast-changing cultural destination. Buildings, retailers, shops, people come and go. Stores literally close overnight to rebrand themselves or open as another store entirely in a matter of days. Permit drawings are submitted over the internet and reviewed in a matter of days, if not hours. Mornings start early, people play late. 

Restaurant row near our home base in Ilsan. Bright lights, all, night, long... no matter what day of the week.

Restaurant row near our home base in Ilsan. Bright lights, all, night, long... no matter what day of the week.

We had a chance to visit the d gallery (actually in Seoul), a subsidiary gallery of Daelim Museum in Hannamdong, Seoul. The d gallery is an up and coming area that used to be more known for its U.N. Village where many foreigners reside. We happened to catch Thomas Heatherwick's exhibition at the d3 and enjoyed the audio tour guide of his works. Being from the Silicon Valley, we wanted to see more details of the B.I.G. collaboration on the Google campus, but that wasn't to be found. Still top secret stuff we suppose.

Here are some scale models and sketches from Heatherwick of the signature chairs. They had some full size ones at the end of the exhibition for us to try out. Great fun, impeccable balance. 

Here are some scale models and sketches from Heatherwick of the signature chairs. They had some full size ones at the end of the exhibition for us to try out. Great fun, impeccable balance. 

We also wanted to see for ourselves the highly critiqued DDP by the late Zaha Hadid. When we asked our friends and family about the building, we got mostly negative responses back saying that the building didn't fit in with its surroundings and that it looked like a spaceship had landed.

For us, the initial impression was respect. Respect for not only a great architect who has passed, but respect for the curves and the way in which a foreign architect was able to keep the quality pristine. The metal panels laid across the forms are pure art, to be admired.

Notice the sleek exterior metal panels. They're all precisely aligned and held off the structure in a consistent manner. Some panels larger, some smaller, some perforated for venting, exhaust, intake, etc. 

Notice the sleek exterior metal panels. They're all precisely aligned and held off the structure in a consistent manner. Some panels larger, some smaller, some perforated for venting, exhaust, intake, etc. 

I think the majority of people don't understand how big a deal this is; how hard this is to accomplish. Yet, when visiting the site, we only saw positive reactions and responses from visitors and users. 

As far as we could tell, everyone at the DDP was soaking it in and enjoying it. We're so glad we got to visit it as you can't critique this project without having been, and experienced it.

As far as we could tell, everyone at the DDP was soaking it in and enjoying it. We're so glad we got to visit it as you can't critique this project without having been, and experienced it.

Unfortunately, the galleries were closed for new exhibits to be put up, but we did get a chance to walk some of the other public areas inside and out. We highly recommend at least paying a visit when visiting Seoul. 

Speaking of curves, when we worked in Seoul, our office did a building with some curves of its own near Gwanghwamun and Gyeongbokgung Palace. It's called the TT building, or the Twin Tree Towers. The form was inspired by tree trunks and is covered in glazing. 

The TT buildings, or the Twin Tree Towers. Very noticeable when visiting the main palace in Seoul and walking by the large public plaza. 

The TT buildings, or the Twin Tree Towers. Very noticeable when visiting the main palace in Seoul and walking by the large public plaza. 

We also spent a few days in the countryside of Korea in a farm town between Seoul and Daejeon called Jincheon. One of our favorite things to do in Korea is to visit the public markets. 

Most of the public markets look very similar. Long open corridors with shops to the left and right, with sidewalk vendors, including a strip of vendors down the center. This is how Koreans used to do all their shopping; for groceries, clothes, household goods, etc.

Most of the public markets look very similar. Long open corridors with shops to the left and right, with sidewalk vendors, including a strip of vendors down the center. This is how Koreans used to do all their shopping; for groceries, clothes, household goods, etc.

On this day, we came not only to observe and soak in, but also to buy some mixed grains and beans. Add them to rice, and you have a healthy, delicious base to your meals.

On this day, we came not only to observe and soak in, but also to buy some mixed grains and beans. Add them to rice, and you have a healthy, delicious base to your meals.

Another favorite building of ours is also a past work from our old office. This is the Camerata Music Listening Hall, by Byoung Soo Cho. The client was a famous Korean TV news broadcast announcer who retired in an art village called Heyri and wanted a space to listen to classical music and share it with others.

Byoung Soo Cho uses a simple palette of materials consisting of exposed concrete, wood, and metal. The exterior structure is beautifully exposed concrete with great detail in the formwork that makes you wonder what goes on in the inside. 

Byoung Soo Cho uses a simple palette of materials consisting of exposed concrete, wood, and metal. The exterior structure is beautifully exposed concrete with great detail in the formwork that makes you wonder what goes on in the inside. 

Once you step inside, you're welcomed into a warm listening hall filled with wooden tables, a wooden soffit, and speakers galore. The client spins his LP records from the far right rear corner for guests of the hall. 

Once you step inside, you're welcomed into a warm listening hall filled with wooden tables, a wooden soffit, and speakers galore. The client spins his LP records from the far right rear corner for guests of the hall. 

Another treat for us this time around was visiting our old co-workers that have also gone off to open their own practices. We visited two of our close friends who have begun an exciting new office and already have several notable projects in the books and realized. 

This is Archihood WXY, Woohyun and Youngjin Kang. 

This is Archihood WXY, Woohyun and Youngjin Kang. 

Another quick picture of their office space very much influenced by our old office led by Byoung Soo Cho. 

Another quick picture of their office space very much influenced by our old office led by Byoung Soo Cho. 

Another small gallery we visited in Seoul is the Kukje Gallery's newest addition, designed by SO-IL Architects. 

This building is wrapped in a perforated metal mesh over the forms of the building to create a fun play of light and shadows that are cast. While the main forms consist of boxes and cylinders, the metal mesh forms curves and a skin that protect and envelope the gallery.

This building is wrapped in a perforated metal mesh over the forms of the building to create a fun play of light and shadows that are cast. While the main forms consist of boxes and cylinders, the metal mesh forms curves and a skin that protect and envelope the gallery.

Kyu's old boss now also has an architecture gallery called "onground". 

The "onground" gallery. Humble and normal looking storefront is the entrance to a lovely gallery of beautiful architectural projects and miniature gallery spaces.

The "onground" gallery. Humble and normal looking storefront is the entrance to a lovely gallery of beautiful architectural projects and miniature gallery spaces.

The same storefront from the inside of the gallery. Simple, minimal, clean, but intricate, well thought out, and full of fantastic projects.

The same storefront from the inside of the gallery. Simple, minimal, clean, but intricate, well thought out, and full of fantastic projects.

Here is a little courtyard after you enter into the gallery. Lovely little outdoor space for a breath of fresh air, recomposition, and experience of natural light within a building.

Here is a little courtyard after you enter into the gallery. Lovely little outdoor space for a breath of fresh air, recomposition, and experience of natural light within a building.

The MMCA Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Seoul has also just opened a new building recently. One of the exhibits featured the Young Architects Program that is in partnership with the MoMA PS1 program for young architects in New York.

It was an honor to see the projects by other young architects in Korea. 

It was an honor to see the projects by other young architects in Korea. 

A view from the current courtyard folly – the folly in the foreground, the museum building to the right and middle-ground, with the old traditional structure in the very background. 

A view from the current courtyard folly – the folly in the foreground, the museum building to the right and middle-ground, with the old traditional structure in the very background. 

In closing, we leave you with two pictures of the Shanghai Expo project that Thomas Heatherwick designed. This is the scale section model that shows the needle-like fiberglass tubes that carry the inventory of the seeds of the world. The interior is very surreal and fluid womb, while the exterior is like a porcupine or sea urchin eager to protect itself.

Summer is a great time to travel, recharge, explore, and learn. Cheers, to Summer in Seoul.

Now check out the other blogs that have featured posts around the same #ArchiTalks topic about summer:

Enoch Sears - Business of Architecture (@businessofarch)
Summer is a Great Time To Market Your Architecture Firm!


Bob Borson - Life of An Architect (@bobborson)
http://www.lifeofanarchitect.com/summer-is-for-the-young-at-heart/


Marica McKeel - Studio MM (@ArchitectMM)
Summer : A Review


Lee Calisti, AIA - Think Architect (@LeeCalisti)
summer working, had me a blast


Evan Troxel - Archispeak Podcast / TRXL (@etroxel)
Lake Powell


Lora Teagarden - L² Design, LLC (@L2DesignLLC)
Seasons of Summer


Jes Stafford - MODwelling (@modarchitect)
The Dog Days of Summer


Eric T. Faulkner - Rock Talk (@wishingrockhome)
Summer -- Architecture Imagery


Michele Grace Hottel - Michele Grace Hottel, Architect (@mghottel)
#Architalks 20 "summer" and architecture


Stephen Ramos - BUILDINGS ARE COOL (@sramos_BAC)
4 Secrets To Getting The Most Out Of Your Summer Internship


Brian Paletz - The Emerging Architect (@bpaletz)
Summer Surprise


Michael LaValley - Evolving Architect (@archivalley)
An Acrophobic Architect's Illuminating Summer of Roofs


Sharon George - Architecture By George (@sharonraigeorge)
Glass in Architecture - Summer Wonders


Brinn Miracle - Architangent (@architangent)
4 Reasons Solar Power is a Hot Topic


Emily Grandstaff-Rice - Emily Grandstaff-Rice FAIA (@egrfaia)
Seasonal change


Jarod Hall - di'velept (@divelept)
... and the livin's easy


Drew Paul Bell - Drew Paul Bell (@DrewPaulBell)
Summer...


Samantha Raburn - The Aspiring Architect (@TheAspiringArch)
An Architectural Spark for your Summer


Keith Palma - Architect's Trace (@cogitatedesign)
[Dis]Connected Summer


Adam Denais - Defragging Architecture (@DefragArch)
5 Things to Make the Most of Your Summer


Jim Mehaffey - Yeoman Architect (@jamesmehaffey)
An Architect Summer


Jeffrey A Pelletier - Board & Vellum (@boardandvellum)
Do I Need to Hire an Architect?

p.s. Let us know if you're interested in visiting Korea! 

p.s. Let us know if you're interested in visiting Korea!